Marathon Runner Gives Birth After Finishing Race

FOX Chicago News
Amber Miller felt contractions just minutes after crossing the finish line at the Chicago Marathon. A few hours later, the suburban Chicago woman — who slogged her way through 26.2 miles while nearly 39 weeks pregnant — delivered a healthy baby girl.

“For me, it wasn’t anything out of the ordinary. I was running up until that point anyway,” Miller told The Associated Press in an interview from the hospital where she was recovering Monday. “I am crazy about running.”

Sunday’s marathon was the eighth for the 27-year-old, who has been running for more than a dozen years. She found out she was pregnant with her second child days after signing up for the Chicago race and decided to play it by ear on whether or not she would run.

When the baby hadn’t been born by Sunday, she got clearance from her doctor to run half. She completed it with a with a half-run half-walk approach, drinking lots of fluids and eating a lot along the way. She finished in 6:25:50, much slower than her usual marathon time, but still content.

“Lots of people were cheering me on: `Go pregnant lady!”‘ she said. “I was expecting some negative comments. I don’t remember anything.”

It was not Miller’s first marathon while pregnant.

In May, the Westchester woman ran the Wisconsin Marathon in 4:23:07 while 17 weeks pregnant with her daughter. In 2009, she ran the Indianapolis Marathon in 4:30:27 while she was 18 weeks pregnant with her son Caleb, who’s 1.

Elite runners have trained while pregnant, but doctors say Miller is a rarity. She was 38 weeks and five days pregnant. Full-term is typically defined as 40 weeks.

Marathon world-record holder Paula Radcliffe ran 14 miles a day while pregnant and resumed training weeks after the birth of her first child. She won the New York City Marathon in 2007 just 10 months after delivery. American marathoner Kara Goucher, who gave birth to her son last year, also trained while pregnant, running 80 miles a week at times.

“It’s probably the rare woman who is in good enough shape to run a marathon while pregnant. It’s probably the exception more than the rule,” said Dr. Priya Rajan, an assistant professor in obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

Medical guidelines generally say that if a woman was a runner and healthy before she got pregnant, running during pregnancy is fine. Doctors even recommend exercise for low-risk pregnancies. However, medical experts agree that pregnancy is not the time to begin any exercise endeavors, such as starting marathon training for the first time. For pregnant runners, close monitoring by a doctor is recommended.

Miller who was looking forward to getting rest, said she the only effects she felt from the marathon, which she finished around 3:30 p.m., were blisters on her feet. She was just happy to see her daughter June, who was born at 10:29 p.m. at 7 pounds, 13 ounces with no complications.

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The Daugherty Family Makes Running A Family Event

Our family has Friday family night, which usually consists of going out to eat since by Friday neither of us feel like cooking dinner.  We have three children ages 10, 7 and 2 years old.  On June 3th we spent our family night at the Tiger Classic 5k race in Bristol Pa.  This race is special to our family because it is the race my husband and I met at.  In 1992 the race was 10K held on Memorial Day.  My husband won that race and I finished 2nd in the women’s race.     After the race we got talking, found out we lonely lived 2 miles apart and the rest in history.  At one time we both held the 10k course records. We have traveled back to the race every year.  The girls like eating the goodies after the race and especially enjoy picking prizes from the tables of stuff the race offers.

The race was held on a  Friday evening. The temperature was great better than a week ago when it was in the 90’s.  Shelby and Paige have run several 5k’s   Shelby ran the race solo because my husband ran with our 7-year-old daughter Paige. As Shelby approached the finish on the track a the crowds cheered I heard someone say look at that little girl.  She tried with everything she had left to catch the lady in front of her but the lady told us later she gave everything to stay a head of Shelby- “I could not let a little girl beat me”.  She won the girls 12 and under age group with a time of 28:05 (actually beat the boys in the age group as well.  As Paige approached the finish line the crowds cheered for her and  once again I heard runners say look at the little girl she is even talking.  The runner in front of her said she worked hard to stay ahead of Paige because she couldn’t let a little girl beat her.  The female runner told me she “looked back once and saw a small girl running and talking not out of breath while she was feeling exhausted.  She worked harder because she was worried the little girl would catch her and pass her”.    She was 2nd in the 12 and under age group with a time of 32:22- first place was her big sister.  She ran 6 1/2 minutes faster than lat year at the same race. I also won my age group but the little ones stole the show.  To top off our evening we stopped for ice cream on the way home.    The girls earned a large ice cream.

Both our daughters think nothing running a race.  The incredible thing is they don’t train at all.  They sign up for a race, the week before run 2 miles and them race the 5k.  Months later the same thing for another race.  We want them to enjoy what they are doing after all most sports use running as a punishment.  They view it as something they can do that most adults wont do.  The Tiger race next year may have another Daugherty entered.  Miles is only turning three in September but he runs around trying to keep up with his sisters, so the  1 mile should be no problem for Miles.  Look out Girls Cross Country team competitors in 2017 the Daugherty girls are coming.

The Stitch

Description:
We’ve all had this one, a sudden sharp pain in the side of the upper abdomen at the base of the ribs. A side stitch typically happens when you’re really pushing yourself and fades quickly when you slow down or stop. The stitch is particularly common for new runners still adjusting to the rigors of running.

Likely causes:
The pain is caused by a spasm of the diaphragm, the muscle that controls your breathing. There are a number of possible reasons for this. If your breathing isn’t controlled and disciplined, the diaphragm may be complaining. If you are running too soon after eating, your heavy stomach may literally be tugging at the ligaments connected to the diaphragm. Or you may simply be running too fast for your body’s breathing machinery to keep up.

Remedy:
A stitch will usually go away quickly after just slowing down or stopping. If you’re in a race or you just don’t want to stop, however, you can often make it go away by bringing your breathing into careful control. Concentrate on belly breathing, pushing your belly out when you breathe in and relaxing it as you breathe out. Take deep breaths on the intake, and exhale suddenly, even noisily. To get the diaphragm to contract in rhythm with your steps, try to inhale and exhale as you land on your left foot. Strange but true, this can help prevent spasms by encouraging the diaphragm to bounce along in sync with your stride.

If the pain is just too much and you have to stop, try bending over and raising your knee on the stitch side while pressing your fingers deep into the painful area and tightening your stomach muscles. Or just walk while belly breathing.

How Running Helps Your Body

Cardiovascular exercise:

Running is a very good cardiovascular aerobic exercise. When a person runs, you  strengthening the muscles involved in respiration, which helps facilitate the flow of air in and out of the lungs. It also helps improving circulation efficiency and reduce blood pressure.

Regular running helps keep one’s stamina up, and gives you more time before you get that “out of breath” feeling.

Most running watches are equipped with logs for a history of your training to help the individual keep track of workouts.  It checks whether you were truly able to improve your running strength and endurance by checking how fast or how long you were able to maintain a certain pace.

Strengthens leg and foot muscles:

Aside from being out of breath, one of the reasons that people are not able to “go the distance” is  because of the pain in their weak leg muscles. When a person lives an inactive lifestyle, these muscles weaken and are unable to endure moving long distances.

On the other hand, a person who runs regularly would be able to strengthen these muscles making them more capable of enduring longer distances.

Individuals will notice this improvement more today because of  running GPS watch’s  that could accurately track the distances that you have traveled during each training session.

Increases speed and reflexes:

Running regularly would help you increase your speed reflex times. This is because you are able to make your muscles move more efficiently and in a pre-programmed manner due to the continuous training or running movements that you do while running.

You would be able to see a drop in your lap or split times because your muscles in your entire body have now become stronger and more capable to push your pace.

Individuals are able to track this improvement because of  running watch’s capability to track your time accurately up to the hundredths of a second.

Now that you see the benefits of doing running training regularly, what are you waiting for? P{ut your sneakers on, strap on a running watch and get on the road, oval, or athletics track and begin your running training now!  Your body will thank you in the future.

McDonald’s-only runner finishes in top 30 top at Los Angeles Marathon

Can you believe a marathon runner vowed to eat only McDonald’s in the 30 days leading up to the Los Angeles Marathon? To make it even more unbelievable he ran a   personal best time at the event and finished 29th overall.

Joe D’Amico, a 36-year-old dad from Palatine, Illinois has completed 14 marathons. But the 2011 Los Angeles Marathon had a different twist same training but he ate McDonald’s for 30 days prior to the race.   Joe  ran the marathon in 2:36:13 on March 20, 2011 beating his previous personal record by 41 seconds.
“It went just as I planned,” Mr D’Amico said after completing the 42.1km race.

“The course was much tougher than I expected and the wind and rain didn’t help, but I felt strong.”

In the month leading up to the marathon, D’Amico ate 99 meals at McDonald’s.

His typical daily intake consisted of hotcakes and an Egg McMuffin for breakfast, a grilled chicken burger and a large Coke for lunch, and a hamburger and fries for dinner.

He allowed himself to drink water and take a daily multivitamin and a runner’s supplement.

He said he took on the personal challenge because he loves McDonald’s and running, and but insisted he was not trying to make a point.

His effort garnered more than 23,000 Facebook fans and raised $27,000 for Ronald McDonald House Charities.

Mr D’Amico said his wife chose the restaurant where they ate last night.

“We managed to walk past a couple of McDonald’s restaurants after the race without stopping,” he said.

“I’ll probably be back in a McDonald’s sometime next week.”

Anyone that has trained for a marathon will find this story unusual maybe hard to believe.  The best part was the money he raised for  the Ronald McDonald house.  What better way to combined two things.  With his little twist on training for this marathon he probably had lots of people thinking he was crazy. But he did pick some of the healthier meals not Big Macs and supper size fries.

Do Race Winners Train Harder?

The best runners understand that the athlete who wins a race often is not the one who trains the hardest but the one who trains the smartest.  Nothing will decrease your training, fitness or conditioning like an injury especially one that may have been prevented in the first place.  Competitive runners know the fastest way to get to peak performance is not running yourself into the ground and possibly to an injury but the runner who listens to their body.

Runners stress their bodies to the limit.  Speed workouts, increased mileage, and racing add stress to the body.  Recovery is critical.  Recovery allows your body to perform to it’s  fullest potential.  Runners often become to focused on the training and improving one’s times that they ignore warning signs which could result in an injury.

One way to prevent over training is to use a heart rate monitor while you are running.  Heart rate monitors help the individual workout within the individuals target heart rate zone.  The heart rate monitor can be set to beep if you are above (to fast) or below (to slow) your target heart rate zone.  By monitoring your heart rate you get instant feed back  of how hard or easy you are running.  Most runners don’t have a problem running hard, more importantly heart rate monitors let you know if you are actually running easy on your easy days.  You can fool yourself during a run that the pace feels slow but if you have a heart rate monitor on your heart will not be fooled.  A hear rate monitor will help the individual adjust the pace for various terrains and weather conditions.  If you are running up a hill or into a strong wind your heart will have to work harder and the monitor will let you know instantly if you are going to hard resulting in the runner slowing.

Don’t ignore what your body is telling you. If something is hurting pay attention to it, find out why, and change what is making it hurt. Rest if necessary, but if the pain doesn’t fade, don’t forget a visit to the doctor’s office if necessary.

101 Greatest Running Tips- Part 5

81. Know when it’s show time “Just remember this: Nobody ever won the olive wreath with an impressive training diary.” –Marty Liquori

82. Taper on time “The key step between a great training program and a great race is a great taper. Your last long training run before a marathon should come 3 weeks before the race–not 2.” –Pete Pfitzinger, two-time U.S. Olympic marathoner

83. Wait for the weights “If you strength train, shelve your routine about a month before your marathon, to help you feel fresh on the big day.” –Steve Spence, 1991 World Championships Marathon bronze medallist

84. Hone in on the range “Rather than going into a marathon with just one goal–such as finishing in a very specific time–develop a range of goals so that you increase your chances of success.” –Jerry Lynch, Ph.D., marathoner

85. The Total Runner: Don’t be in a rush “Thanks to the race-day adrenaline rush, any pace will feel easier than normal. So make a conscious effort to hold back in the early miles.” –Lorraine Moller

86. Divide by three “Divide the marathon into thirds. Run the first part with your head, the middle part with your personality, and the last part with your heart.” –Mike Fanelli, runner and coach

87. Walk before you crawl “When using the run-walk method to finish a marathon, the most important walk break comes in the first mile. The second most important one comes in the second mile, and so on. The point is, walk before you become fatigued.” –Jeff Galloway

88. Be a little shady “Squinting intently requires more energy than you can spare over 26.2 miles. So if it’s sunny or you’re allergic to dust or pollen, wear sunglasses.” –Kim Jones, world-class masters marathoner

89. Save up “To be effective over the last 6 miles of a marathon, one must harbor some sort of emotional as well as physical reserves.” –Kenny Moore, writer and two-time U.S. Olympic marathoner

90. Forget about it! “You have to forget your last marathon before you try another. Your mind can’t know what’s coming.” –Frank Shorter

91. Find a cheerleader “The primary reason to have a coach is to have someone who says: ‘Hey, you’re looking good today!'” –Jack Daniels, Ph.D

92. Be a copy cat “Visualizing perfect running form will help you stay relaxed. Visualize before the race. Then, once you’re in the race, pick out someone who’s looking good and running relaxed. This will help you do the same.” –Gayle Barron, 1978 Boston Marathon champion

93. Don’t over think it “In running I go by the axiom that my coach Jumbo Elliott of Villanova used: KISS–Keep It Simple, Stupid.” –Marty Liquori

94. Take baby steps “You can’t climb up to the second floor without a ladder. When you set your goal too high and don’t fulfill it, your enthusiasm turns to bitterness. Try for a goal that’s reasonable, and then gradually raise it.” –Emil Zatopek, four-time Olympic gold medalist from Czechoslavakia

95. Muster your mental might “Keep working on mental attitude. You have to fight that supposedly rational voice that says: ‘I’m 50 years old, and I don’t have to be doing this anymore.'” –Ken Sparks, Ph.D.

96. Train with someone...                                                                                                                                  “It may seem odd to hear a coach say this, but I think a really great training partner is more important than a coach.” –Joan Nesbit, coach and world-class runner

97. …Anyone...                                                                                                                                                      “Never underestimate the value of a good training partner, even if it’s your dog. Training allies will get you out the door on those days when exercise might otherwise be reduced to a finger on the remote control button.” –Runner’s World editors

98. …But sometimes go solo “The day after a hard workout, I always train alone. If you run with someone else, there can be a tendency to push harder than you should.” –Mark Allen, former Ironman champion

99. Find a reason why “We run to undo the damage we’ve done to body and spirit. We run to find some part of ourselves yet undiscovered.” –John “The Penguin” Bingham

100. Feel the magic...                                                                                                                                               “For me, running is a lifestyle and an art. I’m far more interested in the magic of it than the mechanics.” –Lorraine Moller

101….But do what you must do “If one can stick to training throughout many long years, then willpower is no longer a problem. It’s raining? That doesn’t matter. I’m tired? That’s beside the point. It’s simply that I have to.” –Emil Zatopek